9 Best Forex Brokers for 2020 - ForexBrokers.com

Yes! You get precise entry points for SL and TP. The #nextgenindicator, #VelocityFinderNeuralTrader does a lot of complex calculations at the back end and reduces your burden. And always comes with accurate #SL & #TP. Get it now: https://wetalktrade.com/velocity-finder-best-forex-trading-strategies/

Yes! You get precise entry points for SL and TP. The #nextgenindicator, #VelocityFinderNeuralTrader does a lot of complex calculations at the back end and reduces your burden. And always comes with accurate #SL & #TP. Get it now: https://wetalktrade.com/velocity-finder-best-forex-trading-strategies/ submitted by Wetalktrade to u/Wetalktrade [link] [comments]

Bang On! Pipbreaker hits the TP again. This time it made 121 pips in NZD/CAD. Want to make the most of the short-term volatility? Get Pipbreaker now https://wetalktrade.com/best-indicator-for-mt4/ #pipbreaker #forex #volatility #NZDCAD #chartpattern #technicalindicator #forexmarket #forexsignals

Bang On! Pipbreaker hits the TP again. This time it made 121 pips in NZD/CAD. Want to make the most of the short-term volatility? Get Pipbreaker now https://wetalktrade.com/best-indicator-for-mt4/ #pipbreaker #forex #volatility #NZDCAD #chartpattern #technicalindicator #forexmarket #forexsignals submitted by Wetalktrade to u/Wetalktrade [link] [comments]

Decided to trade stock algorithmically instead of forex. They jump around significantly more, does this cause issues with SL & TPs?

I'm not sure how it works with stocks, but day to day you can get like 3-4% jumps. how does this work with stop losses?
In forex, they can typically jump over your SL price, missing it altogether. I don't see why it would be any different for stocks, but that is a much bigger issue here due to how frequently it jumps.
submitted by quantumwoooo to algotrading [link] [comments]

Decided to trade stock algorithmically instead of forex. They jump around significantly more, does this cause issues with SL & TPs?

submitted by nadonet to StonkFeed [link] [comments]

Clear All SL and TP script for MetaTrader 4 – Free Forex EA Robots

submitted by forexearobots to u/forexearobots [link] [comments]

Every trading the Yen, double check your positions.

Fireworks might go off if/when Abe steps downs later today. It already caused a rally from the rumours so double check your positions. Just in case you’re on the wrong side. ✌🏼 Edit: Everyone*
submitted by SansPotato to Forex [link] [comments]

Displays open SL and TP totals Forex Indicator MetaTrader 4 - Download

Displays open SL and TP totals Forex Indicator MetaTrader 4 - Download submitted by ForexMTindicators to u/ForexMTindicators [link] [comments]

SL&TP Values MetaTrader 4 Forex Indicator

SL&TP Values MetaTrader 4 Forex Indicator submitted by ForexMTindicators to u/ForexMTindicators [link] [comments]

Displays open SL and TP totals Forex Indicator MetaTrader 4

Displays open SL and TP totals Forex Indicator MetaTrader 4 submitted by ForexMTindicators to u/ForexMTindicators [link] [comments]

Lessons from gaining 500% in a week & losing about half of it

Hello, just want to share my experience trading forex this week. So I had about $55 in my trading account and started trading GBPJPY on Monday. Won 3 out of 4 trades. But the big wins came from the XAUUSD dump this week in which I took a lot of trades and I got lucky. Felt surreal when my account reached $350 and should’ve probably stopped. But still decided to enter trades and that’s where things got pretty bad. I still have an open trade as of writing and my equity is down. XAUUSD is a beast! Been trading for almost a year now but not regularly and I only trade small amounts. This is the 1st time I made such gain and I’m not sure if I can do this again.
Here’s a screenshot: https://i.postimg.cc/ZY37hRJX/6-F33601-E-C36-A-4702-A31-B-49986022-D6-F6.jpg
Lesson learned:
**UPDATE: Been getting DMs asking about my strategy. I use price action and I don’t use any indicators. I draw 1-2 trend lines based from previous strong support and resistance. I want a clean chart as it’s easier for me. I also did 5 years worth of backtesting. My biggest issue, as I’m sure you’ve noticed, are sticking to my trading plan (stop looking at the chart all the time after entering a trade, and closing too soon due to reversals), and discipline (don’t FOMO and setting my goals).
I still don’t consider myself as a “trader” per se, so please do your own backtesting. I was also looking for the “best strategy” when I was starting out, until I realize that your results would largely depend on your attitude vs your strategy.
submitted by vongutom to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: some thoughts

Former investment bank FX trader: some thoughts
Hi guys,
I have been using reddit for years in my personal life (not trading!) and wanted to give something back in an area where i am an expert.
I worked at an investment bank for seven years and joined them as a graduate FX trader so have lots of professional experience, by which i mean I was trained and paid by a big institution to trade on their behalf. This is very different to being a full-time home trader, although that is not to discredit those guys, who can accumulate a good amount of experience/wisdom through self learning.
When I get time I'm going to write a mid-length posts on each topic for you guys along the lines of how i was trained. I guess there would be 15-20 topics in total so about 50-60 posts. Feel free to comment or ask questions.
The first topic is Risk Management and we'll cover it in three parts
Part I
  • Why it matters
  • Position sizing
  • Kelly
  • Using stops sensibly
  • Picking a clear level

Why it matters

The first rule of making money through trading is to ensure you do not lose money. Look at any serious hedge fund’s website and they’ll talk about their first priority being “preservation of investor capital.”
You have to keep it before you grow it.
Strangely, if you look at retail trading websites, for every one article on risk management there are probably fifty on trade selection. This is completely the wrong way around.
The great news is that this stuff is pretty simple and process-driven. Anyone can learn and follow best practices.
Seriously, avoiding mistakes is one of the most important things: there's not some holy grail system for finding winning trades, rather a routine and fairly boring set of processes that ensure that you are profitable, despite having plenty of losing trades alongside the winners.

Capital and position sizing

The first thing you have to know is how much capital you are working with. Let’s say you have $100,000 deposited. This is your maximum trading capital. Your trading capital is not the leveraged amount. It is the amount of money you have deposited and can withdraw or lose.
Position sizing is what ensures that a losing streak does not take you out of the market.
A rule of thumb is that one should risk no more than 2% of one’s account balance on an individual trade and no more than 8% of one’s account balance on a specific theme. We’ll look at why that’s a rule of thumb later. For now let’s just accept those numbers and look at examples.
So we have $100,000 in our account. And we wish to buy EURUSD. We should therefore not be risking more than 2% which $2,000.
We look at a technical chart and decide to leave a stop below the monthly low, which is 55 pips below market. We’ll come back to this in a bit. So what should our position size be?
We go to the calculator page, select Position Size and enter our details. There are many such calculators online - just google "Pip calculator".

https://preview.redd.it/y38zb666e5h51.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=26e4fe569dc5c1f43ce4c746230c49b138691d14
So the appropriate size is a buy position of 363,636 EURUSD. If it reaches our stop level we know we’ll lose precisely $2,000 or 2% of our capital.
You should be using this calculator (or something similar) on every single trade so that you know your risk.
Now imagine that we have similar bets on EURJPY and EURGBP, which have also broken above moving averages. Clearly this EUR-momentum is a theme. If it works all three bets are likely to pay off. But if it goes wrong we are likely to lose on all three at once. We are going to look at this concept of correlation in more detail later.
The total amount of risk in our portfolio - if all of the trades on this EUR-momentum theme were to hit their stops - should not exceed $8,000 or 8% of total capital. This allows us to go big on themes we like without going bust when the theme does not work.
As we’ll see later, many traders only win on 40-60% of trades. So you have to accept losing trades will be common and ensure you size trades so they cannot ruin you.
Similarly, like poker players, we should risk more on trades we feel confident about and less on trades that seem less compelling. However, this should always be subject to overall position sizing constraints.
For example before you put on each trade you might rate the strength of your conviction in the trade and allocate a position size accordingly:

https://preview.redd.it/q2ea6rgae5h51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=4332cb8d0bbbc3d8db972c1f28e8189105393e5b
To keep yourself disciplined you should try to ensure that no more than one in twenty trades are graded exceptional and allocated 5% of account balance risk. It really should be a rare moment when all the stars align for you.
Notice that the nice thing about dealing in percentages is that it scales. Say you start out with $100,000 but end the year up 50% at $150,000. Now a 1% bet will risk $1,500 rather than $1,000. That makes sense as your capital has grown.
It is extremely common for retail accounts to blow-up by making only 4-5 losing trades because they are leveraged at 50:1 and have taken on far too large a position, relative to their account balance.
Consider that GBPUSD tends to move 1% each day. If you have an account balance of $10k then it would be crazy to take a position of $500k (50:1 leveraged). A 1% move on $500k is $5k.
Two perfectly regular down days in a row — or a single day’s move of 2% — and you will receive a margin call from the broker, have the account closed out, and have lost all your money.
Do not let this happen to you. Use position sizing discipline to protect yourself.

Kelly Criterion

If you’re wondering - why “about 2%” per trade? - that’s a fair question. Why not 0.5% or 10% or any other number?
The Kelly Criterion is a formula that was adapted for use in casinos. If you know the odds of winning and the expected pay-off, it tells you how much you should bet in each round.
This is harder than it sounds. Let’s say you could bet on a weighted coin flip, where it lands on heads 60% of the time and tails 40% of the time. The payout is $2 per $1 bet.
Well, absolutely you should bet. The odds are in your favour. But if you have, say, $100 it is less obvious how much you should bet to avoid ruin.
Say you bet $50, the odds that it could land on tails twice in a row are 16%. You could easily be out after the first two flips.
Equally, betting $1 is not going to maximise your advantage. The odds are 60/40 in your favour so only betting $1 is likely too conservative. The Kelly Criterion is a formula that produces the long-run optimal bet size, given the odds.
Applying the formula to forex trading looks like this:
Position size % = Winning trade % - ( (1- Winning trade %) / Risk-reward ratio
If you have recorded hundreds of trades in your journal - see next chapter - you can calculate what this outputs for you specifically.
If you don't have hundreds of trades then let’s assume some realistic defaults of Winning trade % being 30% and Risk-reward ratio being 3. The 3 implies your TP is 3x the distance of your stop from entry e.g. 300 pips take profit and 100 pips stop loss.
So that’s 0.3 - (1 - 0.3) / 3 = 6.6%.
Hold on a second. 6.6% of your account probably feels like a LOT to risk per trade.This is the main observation people have on Kelly: whilst it may optimise the long-run results it doesn’t take into account the pain of drawdowns. It is better thought of as the rational maximum limit. You needn’t go right up to the limit!
With a 30% winning trade ratio, the odds of you losing on four trades in a row is nearly one in four. That would result in a drawdown of nearly a quarter of your starting account balance. Could you really stomach that and put on the fifth trade, cool as ice? Most of us could not.
Accordingly people tend to reduce the bet size. For example, let’s say you know you would feel emotionally affected by losing 25% of your account.
Well, the simplest way is to divide the Kelly output by four. You have effectively hidden 75% of your account balance from Kelly and it is now optimised to avoid a total wipeout of just the 25% it can see.
This gives 6.6% / 4 = 1.65%. Of course different trading approaches and different risk appetites will provide different optimal bet sizes but as a rule of thumb something between 1-2% is appropriate for the style and risk appetite of most retail traders.
Incidentally be very wary of systems or traders who claim high winning trade % like 80%. Invariably these don’t pass a basic sense-check:
  • How many live trades have you done? Often they’ll have done only a handful of real trades and the rest are simulated backtests, which are overfitted. The model will soon die.
  • What is your risk-reward ratio on each trade? If you have a take profit $3 away and a stop loss $100 away, of course most trades will be winners. You will not be making money, however! In general most traders should trade smaller position sizes and less frequently than they do. If you are going to bias one way or the other, far better to start off too small.

How to use stop losses sensibly

Stop losses have a bad reputation amongst the retail community but are absolutely essential to risk management. No serious discretionary trader can operate without them.
A stop loss is a resting order, left with the broker, to automatically close your position if it reaches a certain price. For a recap on the various order types visit this chapter.
The valid concern with stop losses is that disreputable brokers look for a concentration of stops and then, when the market is close, whipsaw the price through the stop levels so that the clients ‘stop out’ and sell to the broker at a low rate before the market naturally comes back higher. This is referred to as ‘stop hunting’.
This would be extremely immoral behaviour and the way to guard against it is to use a highly reputable top-tier broker in a well regulated region such as the UK.
Why are stop losses so important? Well, there is no other way to manage risk with certainty.
You should always have a pre-determined stop loss before you put on a trade. Not having one is a recipe for disaster: you will find yourself emotionally attached to the trade as it goes against you and it will be extremely hard to cut the loss. This is a well known behavioural bias that we’ll explore in a later chapter.
Learning to take a loss and move on rationally is a key lesson for new traders.
A common mistake is to think of the market as a personal nemesis. The market, of course, is totally impersonal; it doesn’t care whether you make money or not.
Bruce Kovner, founder of the hedge fund Caxton Associates
There is an old saying amongst bank traders which is “losers average losers”.
It is tempting, having bought EURUSD and seeing it go lower, to buy more. Your average price will improve if you keep buying as it goes lower. If it was cheap before it must be a bargain now, right? Wrong.
Where does that end? Always have a pre-determined cut-off point which limits your risk. A level where you know the reason for the trade was proved ‘wrong’ ... and stick to it strictly. If you trade using discretion, use stops.

Picking a clear level

Where you leave your stop loss is key.
Typically traders will leave them at big technical levels such as recent highs or lows. For example if EURUSD is trading at 1.1250 and the recent month’s low is 1.1205 then leaving it just below at 1.1200 seems sensible.

If you were going long, just below the double bottom support zone seems like a sensible area to leave a stop
You want to give it a bit of breathing room as we know support zones often get challenged before the price rallies. This is because lots of traders identify the same zones. You won’t be the only one selling around 1.1200.
The “weak hands” who leave their sell stop order at exactly the level are likely to get taken out as the market tests the support. Those who leave it ten or fifteen pips below the level have more breathing room and will survive a quick test of the level before a resumed run-up.
Your timeframe and trading style clearly play a part. Here’s a candlestick chart (one candle is one day) for GBPUSD.

https://preview.redd.it/moyngdy4f5h51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=91af88da00dd3a09e202880d8029b0ddf04fb802
If you are putting on a trend-following trade you expect to hold for weeks then you need to have a stop loss that can withstand the daily noise. Look at the downtrend on the chart. There were plenty of days in which the price rallied 60 pips or more during the wider downtrend.
So having a really tight stop of, say, 25 pips that gets chopped up in noisy short-term moves is not going to work for this kind of trade. You need to use a wider stop and take a smaller position size, determined by the stop level.
There are several tools you can use to help you estimate what is a safe distance and we’ll look at those in the next section.
There are of course exceptions. For example, if you are doing range-break style trading you might have a really tight stop, set just below the previous range high.

https://preview.redd.it/ygy0tko7f5h51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=34af49da61c911befdc0db26af66f6c313556c81
Clearly then where you set stops will depend on your trading style as well as your holding horizons and the volatility of each instrument.
Here are some guidelines that can help:
  1. Use technical analysis to pick important levels (support, resistance, previous high/lows, moving averages etc.) as these provide clear exit and entry points on a trade.
  2. Ensure that the stop gives your trade enough room to breathe and reflects your timeframe and typical volatility of each pair. See next section.
  3. Always pick your stop level first. Then use a calculator to determine the appropriate lot size for the position, based on the % of your account balance you wish to risk on the trade.
So far we have talked about price-based stops. There is another sort which is more of a fundamental stop, used alongside - not instead of - price stops. If either breaks you’re out.
For example if you stop understanding why a product is going up or down and your fundamental thesis has been confirmed wrong, get out. For example, if you are long because you think the central bank is turning hawkish and AUDUSD is going to play catch up with rates … then you hear dovish noises from the central bank and the bond yields retrace lower and back in line with the currency - close your AUDUSD position. You already know your thesis was wrong. No need to give away more money to the market.

Coming up in part II

EDIT: part II here
Letting stops breathe
When to change a stop
Entering and exiting winning positions
Risk:reward ratios
Risk-adjusted returns

Coming up in part III

Squeezes and other risks
Market positioning
Bet correlation
Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

I have created a monster.

I have been trading for 3 months (6 months demo before that). Up until 3 days ago I have always traded with discipline, set SL, understood risk management and make reports out of downloadable CSV data from the broker. I even journal each trade at the end of the day. Each trade I make risks from 0.5% - 2% depending on how confident I am on the particular trade. The first 2 months of grind made 5% and 7% respectively.
Several days ago, I lost 3 trades in a row and felt like George Costanza. It was especially demoralizing because I followed the technical, fundamental, trend, and confirmed with indicator, etc... yet, each went straight for my SL. I took the day off and reflected on what I did wrong. I lost 6% of my capital that day, a whole month's work.
The very next day, during the Fed chair Powell speech, I focused on EUUSD, and as the chart started to run higher and higher, I am not sure what came over me, I entered long at 1.18401 and risked 20% of my capital. I was going to enter my usual 2% risk, but the greed (subconsciously?) in me added an extra 0. The very second the trade was entered, I felt a hot flash and my heart started pumping, I entered into loss territory, my heart sunk as I watch it go down 10 pips, 15 pips, if only for 15 seconds. Then it started going up, and it was exhilarating watching the profits. I had the good sense to enter TP at 1.189, and it got there 15 minutes later. I had just made a little over 10% of my capital in 15 minutes. Recovered yesterday's 6% loss and then some.
I told my self that this was a one time thing, stupid and impulsive thing to do... until the next day...
I saw a good opportunity with USD/JPY. I didn't even bother to check anything, technical, fundamental, indicators, NOTHING! Just that vertical cliff short candle... , my god, that full short candle, and the speed! This time, very much a conscious decision, I entered short with 30% of my capital at 106.5. 4 hours later, I hit my TP at 105.5. I had made 30% of my capital in 4 hours.
In the last 2 trading days, up 40% of my capital, including my previous 2 months of measly 12% in comparison, I am roughly up 50% of my original capital in 3 months.
This has been a good week to say the least. But I am afraid I have created an insatiable monster. The greed has overtaken good sense, and this is quite possibly the origin story of a blown account.
submitted by DodoGizmo to Forex [link] [comments]

I Automated & Backtested ParallaxFX Strategy

I am a Software Engineer / Data Scientist and I decided to give a go at automating a strategy based on the ParallaxFX strategy floating around and backtests the results, also due to some inspiration by Vanguer
 
I backtested on the majors 4H timeframe between January 2015 to January 2020.
 
I am only considering trades from the top and bottom bands for now.
 
My trading criteria is:
 
Upper Band
Indecision candle
Setup candle
 
Lower Band
Indecision candle
Setup candle
 
Entry: 38.2 Fib
Stop Loss: 100 Fib
Take Profit: -161.8 Fib
RRR: 3.23
 
If a candle meets my trade criteria I open the trade and forget about it.
 
I started with a balance of 500 EUR and a risk of 1%. The results use compound gain / loss and I only considered one currency pair at a time.
 
The results were not that impressive...
EUUSD
AUD/USD
GBP/USD
NZD/USD
USD/CAD
USD/CHF
 
Due to this being automated I can test a variety of parameters pretty quickly and come back with trading screenshots, results, etc.
 
I am considering a higher timeframe but the number of trades is already fairly low.
 
Here is a link to a Google Drive (https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/16cO0ZSCGakkbK90lh-FBIC3ZJIxOj9fI?usp=sharing) with screenshots from each trade and a log of the system as it makes the trades. The candles highlighted in yellow / purple are where the trade is entered. I do not have the picture marked as a win / lose but it should be obvious by the candle formation.
submitted by TribeFX to Forex [link] [comments]

Question about the basic concept of how buying and selling affects the price

The concept is very simple but I find myself getting confused.
When a group of people buy something, demand is generated so price goes up.
When a group of people sell something supply is generated so price goes down.
In the Forex market, say I had an unlimited amount of money enough to drive the market in any direction, when I buy a pair, the price naturally goes up. Now when it hits my TP, what am I doing exactly? I have to sell what I bought to take away my money plus a profit correct? My question is does this count as a sell or does this not affect the market? So when I pull my money out does the market then take a dip or keep on rising?
  1. Say I bought a pair and then pulled out at my TP with a profit. Does the market go down because I pulled out?
  2. Say I went short on a pair and since I was selling the market goes down.
What the difference between 1 and 2? I get the feeling that after you have bought or sold and you pull out you don't affect the market in any way. You only drive the price up or down when you long or short in the beginning when you initially buy or sell.
submitted by themjcg7 to Forex [link] [comments]

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

Help with closing trades

Hey Reddit Users,
So, I’ve been “trading” Forex for close to 7 months now. Since the lockdown in the UK I was furloughed so have been investing on average 7-8 hours a day in trying to up-skill myself in regards to all things Forex. I have gained my knowledge from mainly YouTube, Babypips & the demo account I have been using since the start.
Most of the trades I place do enter profit but they rarely seem to hit the trade profit that I set. Rather, they get to maybe half way or three quarters of the way to trade profit but then there’s a reversal. I’m not sure if I’m setting my trade profit too high or I’m not doing something correctly.
Can somebody share some advice on what you do when your trade enters profit e.g do you move stop loss to entry or higher? How to you decide where to put trade profit? - I normally set at TP where I see there has been a good amount of resistance/support previously.
Also any advice for a new trader is welcomed.
Thanks!
submitted by HenryAH to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex là gì? Thị trường Forex giao dịch như thế nào?

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Forex là gì? Thị trường Forex giao dịch như thế nào?

26 Tháng Ba, 2020 Bởi Nguyễn Duy Kiệt
Forex đối với những ai làm trong lĩnh vực chứng khoán và tiền tệ sẽ không còn quá xa lạ. Tuy nhiên để thực sự hiểu sâu và hiểu đúng về quy cách của forex thì không phải ai cũng biết.
Bài viết dưới đây của Kiệt hôm nay sẽ giúp bạn hiểu được forex là gì? và những thông tin cần biết về forex. Hy vọng sẽ cung cấp được những thông tin bổ ích cho bạn.

Forex là gì?

Nội dung bài viết
Forex là từ được viết tắt Foreign Exchange. Nó có nghĩa tức là trao đổi tiền tệ quốc tế. Hay nói cách khác Forex là thị trường ngoại hối nơi mà các hoạt động trao đổi, buôn bán tiền tệ đủ loại trên thế giới diễn ra nhờ những hệ thống quản lý trung gian của các ngân hàng cũng như những địa chỉ quản lý riêng như các tổ chức tín dụng.
📷Forex là gì?
Đối với một số người khi nghe thấy định nghĩa Forex sẽ thấy sự xa lạ. Thường người ta sẽ nghĩ rằng chỉ có những thời điểm bản thân đi du lịch nước ngoài thì mới có cơ hội giao dịch Forex. Điều đó có thể là đúng đắn tuy nhiên chưa hề đủ.
Giao dịch ngoại hối Forex là một hoạt động rất thường nhật. Và tất cả chúng ta đều đang tham gia công việc này một cách gián tiếp.
Bạn có thể tham khảo một ví dụ cơ bản như thế này để hiểu rõ hơn đó là: Những món hàng được nhập khẩu từ các quốc gia khác trên thế giới được chuyển giao nhiều đến nước mình.
Khi mua hàng tuy bạn mua gián tiếp nhưng thực chất những người giao dịch đầu tiên sẽ sử dụng thị trường Forex để trao đổi. Đó được gọi là thị trường giao dịch trực tiếp đầu tiên với những hệ thống tiền tệ quốc tế. Bạn mua hàng sẽ là thế hệ giao dịch đợt gián tiếp.
Một trường hợp giao dịch Forex nữa đó chính là khi bạn có những chuyến du lịch hay là di chuyển sang nước ngoài.
Bất cứ một hình thức giao dịch nào với tiền tệ quốc tế cũng được xem là một hình thức giao dịch Forex mà có thể chính bạn đang trải qua. Đó là những ví dụ cụ thể và đơn giản nhất của việc trao đổi Forex.
Xem thêm: IPO là gì ?

Tìm hiểu thị trường Forex giao dịch gì?

Vậy bạn có biết thị trường forex giao dịch những gì không? Hiện nay forex đang cung cấp tổng cộng cho 600 trader trong đó có tiền điện tử, chứng khoán, hàng hóa,…. Và chính mỗi trader đều sử dụng tiền tệ để trao đổi forex. Mỗi một sản phẩm đều được trao đổi theo hình thức cặp đôi và có mang tên của 1 loại tiền tệ cơ bản nhất.
📷Thị trường forex giao dịch những gì?
Sở dĩ được hiểu và quy định như vậy, là bởi trader hiện nay luôn giao dịch dựa trên các quy định của những loại hợp đồng chênh lệch CFD.
Chính vì vậy mà bạn không cần phải sở hữu chúng, chỉ cần dựa trên sự biến động về giá cả tiền tệ bạn cũng có thể kiếm lời được từ sàn giao dịch Forex rồi.

Quy mô thị trường Forex

Vậy còn quy mô của Forex như thế nào? Quy mô của Forex được biết hoạt động liên tục 24/5 từ thứ 2 đến thứ 6. Thị trường Forex không giống như những thị trường truyền thống.
Nó không có trung tâm giao dịch cụ thể. Nó chỉ hoạt động giao dịch theo hình thức thông qua hoạt động của các thiết bị đầu cuối. Vì vậy chỉ cần thiết bị của bạn có kết nối internet thì bạn hoàn toàn có thể kết nối và giao dịch Forex được.
📷Quy mô của thị trường forex
Theo thống kê trong vòng 10 năm khối lượng giao dịch forex tăng lên gấp 10 lần. Điều này diễn ra chính bởi sự phát triển của internet cũng như sự phát triển của hệ thống thanh toán ngân hàng, các trung tâm điều khiển,…. Và sự ảnh hưởng lớn nhất đến phạm vi của forex đó chính là sự phát triển của những nhà đầu tư nhỏ lẻ.
Có thể cảm nhận được rằng forex là thị trường tiềm năng mà bạn không nên bỏ qua. Với sự phát triển như hiện nay, bạn hoàn toàn có thẻ không dừng lại ở những mức lãi suất thấp mà sẽ ngày càng phát triển nguồn vốn cao hơn.
Forex không dừng lại ở quy mô nhỏ lẻ mà có khả năng phát triển đến những giao dịch với khối lượng khổng lồ. Và đương nhiên rằng cũng sẽ có những thua lỗ nhất định nhưng sự vững chắc vị trí đứng của nó là rất cao.
Xem thêm: OTC là gì? Cổ phiếu OTC được chia làm bao nhiêu loại?

Những ai đang tham gia giao dịch forex?

Bạn có biết những ai đang giao dịch forex? Chính bạn cũng đang giao dịch đấy nhé! Forex phân tầng theo những cấp độ hoàn toàn khác nhau.
Và cấp độ lớn nhất đó là các cấp giá thuộc hạng tier 1 đó là các ngân hàng thương mại, các ngân hàng đầu tư chiếm mức giá lên đến khoảng 60% tham gia giao dịch trong thị trường ngoại hối.
📷Những ai đang tham gia giao dịch forex
Tiếp đến cấp bậc thứ 2 là khách hàng của những ngân hàng này. Họ có nguồn vốn nhỏ hơn. Tiếp đến là các tập đoàn lớn đa quốc gia hay những quỹ phòng hộ,… và các forex tạo dựng thị trường nhỏ lẻ.
Đó là những thành phần tham gia thị trường ngoại hối forex nhỏ và lớn khác nhau. Chính việc mua bán hằng ngày của bạn cũng là một hình thức tham gia vào thị trường ngoại hối.

Những nhà cung cấp nguồn vốn lớn cho thị trường forex

Tiếp theo chúng ta cùng tìm hiểu về những nhà cung cấp nguồn vốn lớn hiện nay. Chính sự phân tầng của forex vì thế mà phát sinh ra một số chênh lệch cũng như phí hoa hồng. Không kể đến còn một khoản phát sinh trong quá trình giao động lên xuống của forex.

Ngân hàng trung ương

Đầu tiên là ngân hàng trung ương. Ngân hàng trung ương có một vai trò vô cùng quan trọng trong việc chi phối thị trường. Ngân hàng trung ương tạo dựng ra một nguồn vốn lớn và làm nên sự ổn định cho nền kinh tế mỗi quốc gia và trên thế giới.
📷Những nhà cung cấp nguồn vốn cho thị trường forex
Ngân hàng trung ương tham gia vào thị trường ngoại hối forex. Nó có vai trò cân bằng lại lực lượng tham gia cũng như có vai trò quản lý tiền tệ của chính phủ một cách dễ dàng hơn rất nhiều.
Ngân hàng trung ương không can thiệp nhiều vào các lực lượng tham gia forex cũng như những kế hoạch cấp vốn với thời gian ngắn hạn.
Ngân hàng trung ương giúp chính phủ của các quốc gia có một nguồn vốn dự trữ an toàn để đáp ứng được nhu cầu trao đổi tiền tệ trong nước.

Quỹ tiền tệ quốc tế

Tiếp đến là quỹ tiền tệ quốc tế. Đây là những ngân hàng thuộc về nền kinh tế đang phát triển. Và mục đích lớn nhất của quỹ tiền tệ quốc tế chính là tài trợ cho những dự án xã hội cũng như là giúp vào việc phát triển các cơ sở hạ tầng.
Đồng thời cũng có vai trò giúp kích thích cho sự phát triển của nền kinh tế đối với một số những lĩnh vực nhất định.

Công ty thương mại

Tiếp đến đó là công ty thương mại. Đây là một trong những thành phần quan trọng đối với việc điều hành những hoạt động trên thị trường forex.
So sánh với những công ty dịch vụ thương mại hay là các dịch vụ thanh toán thì công ty thương mại này chiếm một số lượng ít hơn hẳn.
Tuy nhiên nó có tác động lớn đối với dòng chảy thương mại cũng như những hệ thống các nguồn vốn trên thị trường forex.
Chính vì thế mà một số công ty đa quốc gia có thể đem đến sự tác động lớn đến việc tăng giảm cũng như lợi nhuận trong quá trình tiền tệ quốc tế. Đó là các nhà cung cấp nguồn vốn và có tác động trực tiếp đến hoạt động của thị trường ngoại hối.
Trên đây là toàn bộ những thông tin chi tiết nhất về forex là gì, hoạt động và quy mô của nó ra sao. Đồng thời cũng là các thông tin về nhà cung cấp vốn chính xác mà Kiệt chia sẻ vô cùng chi tiết.
Hy vọng những thông tin trên đây thực sự hữu ích cho bạn. Hãy truy cập website : https://duykiet.com/ mỗi ngày để tham khảo thêm những định nghĩa mới, các thông tin mới được cập nhật thường xuyên nhé!
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submitted by prosaccobrad370 to u/prosaccobrad370 [link] [comments]

Detailed Monday scalp explanation!

Detailed Monday scalp explanation!
Dear Traders
Most people know me by now I'm the guy with the 10 pips that always put the same song in the video, because I just love it too much. haha
Well let's get down to business unfortunately I was too tired to write the explanation post yesterday, but it doesn't matter as long as you read through this carefully it doesn't matter when you read this :)
Let's start with the London lunch scalp. A lot of people haven't seen the post because it was posted at a non US friendly time. I'll link it here if you are interested before we get into detail.
Post: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/h9f4q8/cable_scalp_london_lunch_session_the_red_line/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x
So the reason for this entry came from the M15 Chart and you will see why I only take 10 pips and then out immediately.

London Lunch M15 Chart
What you are looking at here is the last up close candle before this "major" dump. What's important tho is that price also immediately went back up and traded over this candle. Now we just wait for price to dip into the red square and we have our free 10 pips. As you see shortly after price went lower so be careful with your target. On HTF if you see something like this it is more likely to give you more pips. Always keep in mind we are on M15/ a LTF so we target conservative!

M1 London Lunch Chart
Just to complete the explanation, here's the M1 chart. Red line was the TP. Square Entry as explained.

Most people probably seen the NY video but I will also link it here.
Post: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/h9i9gf/another_ny_session_another_10_pips_i_messed_up/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x
The other scalp was made in NY and blew up way more. A lot of discussion, questions and accusing of gambling haha as usual. So what's special about this trade... it was my first trade I guess that was purely based of the M1 TF and not like a higher TF candle. Let's look into it.
M1 NY Session Chart
So this is unusual for my chart so many lines/squares ^^ So let's get started from top to bottom. Just a quick mention the two horizontal red lines are entry and TP.
  1. The diagonal line on the top is only there to visualize that the highs are not equal this is the first sign of bearishness.
  2. Red square: Wick of the last down close candle before price shoots up. The wick after price came back down is now seen as a bearish level so if price trades there I look for short entries.
  3. Blue Line: Bodys of the previous low. Candles closed below that line confirming that the low will be broken any time. Price went back up a little and I immediately took action on that. 2 Minutes later price showed me that my levels are accurate and I don't need to FOMO. I should have been patient, so I learned something from this trade!
This wraps up the teaching of my monday scalps!
I might not post tomorrow since I'll not be home and screen recording might be to stressful. We'll see.
Cheers!
submitted by Flotschgee to Forex [link] [comments]

Some thoughts and lessons learnt so far

I have been dabbling with Forex for a few years now, and have started taking it more seriously over the past few months. I feel that I have come a long way and I would like to share my thoughts on what I have found. It would be interesting to see if anyone agrees or disagrees or has come to any similar conclusions.
The first point on my list and perhaps the most important:
Patience, patience, patience.
This is heard everywhere but remains extremely important and also covers a few points. For example;
Wait for a good entry!
Think you have a 'sniper' entry at a trend line or on a support level? Wait!
Think the market has started moving how you anticipated? Wait!
Think the market has given you some confirmation for your trade? Probably still too early!
Think you've missed your opportunity? Now you're getting closer to a good entry.

This will be different for some people and different for varying strategies. For me, there is no point trying to catch a reversal right at the top or bottom. The chances of this are slim. It is so much more fruitful to capture the main bulk of a trend rather than trying to guess the tipping point. The meatiest part of a fish is the body, forget about the head and the tail.
As well as waiting for a good entry, wait for a good trade set up. If there are no good trades, leave the screen and enjoy your day. I think one losing mentality is that money needs to be made now. On the contrary. Zero trades is a whole lot better than five bad ones.

The second point on my list ties into the first somewhat:
Stop closing trades early!
Again, patience is key. It is so easy to see some profit and think that the price is about to go against you. Leave it and see what happens. Perhaps move your SL to break even if this works for you and if the market has retested another resistance etc. but most importantly leave your TP where it is. Hopefully there is a reason you put it there in the first place? Trust that. There is nothing more frustrating than closing a trade early and then watching the price continue in that direction afterwards. Some people like to have 2 or 3 TPs. This is fine but know this before hand and not as an excuse to take some early money. Part of the reason for this point is because I have found I would never seem to want to close losing trades early, so over time this bad habit would become a very expensive one.
The third point I will make for now is my personal experience and might not be that universal:
Widen your stop loss!
I have been very guilty of trying to take a trade with a very optimistic SL and a larger than otherwise lot size, hoping that the price will only move in one direction. Unfortunately most of the time this is not how the market moves. If you have your SL at a reasonable and calculated level, then if the price hits it, there is a good reason for it and the trade was probably bad. It will be so frustrating for both your mental energy and your bankroll if your SL is hit and the price then moves in its original direction. Make sure there is enough wiggle room for this to happen.

Let me know your thoughts, if this is popular I may follow up with a part two. Thanks, Happy trading!
submitted by jahovia to Forex [link] [comments]

Explanation of the previous week

Explanation of the previous week
Hello fellow Traders!
I don't know if you have noticed me but recently I have posted some videos and charts of mine that showed me trading a 10 pip model during London and NY session. Due to the rules my posts got deleted or made invisible. I also got banned from this sub afterwards. A discussion with a mod made him unban me and giving me one last chance.
Well now I try to better myself so I'm here explaining what were the reasons of my trades previous week.
As already told I right now created a new Forex Account just for Reddit where I consistently trade 10+ pips a day, always starting Tuesday since I don't trade Monday (personal reasons). I will continue showing my trading videos just with a better explanation of why I took the trade so you guys can learn from it if you want. I hope by now it should be clear that I'm not doing this for show off purposes since I wouldn't put in so much effort into one thread. So let's review last weeks trades shall we.
Just a heads up you will NEVER find Indicators or other tools in my charts. I trade with a blank chart but for the learning purposes I will outline areas of interest and try to explain as good as I can for you to understand.

H4 Cable chart

My first post was about this H4 GBPUSD Chart. I outlined the the important areas with the brown squares. So first we see price coming down to the last black candle of the low. The last candle of a swing low will often make price go up one more time before breaking the low. In this case price went up to a previous area where a lot of selling took place (the outlined green candle). Why a green candle?? Well in order to resell price has to go up. We don't sell a black candles ;)As you can see once price reached the sensitive selling area price drops lower breaking the low on the left.
I think you can already see that just by using this you could have made 100+ pips just on Friday with almost no draw down. But I don't wanna make you greedy that's why I will continue with my 10 pip model. So let's look into one trade I actually took.

Cable 1 Minute chart
I think the video showing that trade got deleted but I think you can still see it on my profile if you are curious. Well what you see hear is not much different than the H4 Chart. Price traded into a last down close candle of a swing low went back up to a area of selling and then we go down breaking the low. The red lines show my SL and TP while he square shows where my entry was and will be. :)
The reason why I can take this trade and be 100% sure it will be winner is that I know that the H4 chart wants to go lower so obviously a M1 chart will do. I just like to enter a trade and have profits within minutes. I have swing, intraday traded before tho and I can perform just like on a M1 chart but that's just where I feel most comfortable.
Well this wraps up my little teaching!
Enjoy your weekend.
submitted by Flotschgee to Forex [link] [comments]

Looking for the partner to trade crypto together

Hi guys,
I am starting to trade crypto. I can see a lot of volatility and the ability to enter good deals with 2-to-1 and 3-to-1 tp/sl ratios.
I am looking for an intermediate/expert partner to just chat about the strategies and trade together.
I plan to start with the 100$ deposit and the 1% risk profile.
I trade on Binance. It's easy to park cash there without any requirements like you might have for stocks or trading forex with big companies.
submitted by dev_lurve to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

MLFX | Machine Learning Forex | Pinned Message

MLFX | Machine Learning Forex | Pinned Message
Hello and welcome to the MLFX (Machine Learning Forex) sub!
MLFX is the culmination of 10 years of academic research into using machine learning to create predictive algorithms for the Forex markets. Recently we've put more focus on creating a consumer product and we're looking for people to help us with Beta testing the system. There's still a decent amount of work for us to do before we'd consider MLFX v1.0 to be "feature complete" but we're already getting some pretty amazing results. Now comes the test of consistency!
This is what our signals look like (27/08/2020)
https://preview.redd.it/jvwqvw0oahj51.jpg?width=1128&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=1c80e3390d7e63bddbda2987ba613cb9adb12d62
We're currently working on a way to check every trade after the fact and determine if it was a winner or loser, we will also plot each individual trade on a chart (like below) as we already have that functionality.
Red = SL | Blue = TP | Solid = Result
Our algorithm uses multi-agent systems and evolutionary algorithms to create agents (traders) that have been specifically optimized to perform in that current market. I'm not going to go too in-depth in this post if you want to find out more you can here: https://www.mlforex.com/algorithm/agents
If you're interested in assisting with beta testing please join our Telegram group and express your interest. https://t.me/joinchat/IFyZTEw_uhEHe0Oo5uSAVw
submitted by MacSkyver to MLFX_Forex_Tools [link] [comments]

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